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You searched for: subject:"What -- Radio and Plasma Wave Science Instrument"
[image]Detecting Lightning From Saturn - NASA/JPL/University of Iowa
This artist concept shows how Cassini is able to detect radio signals from lightning on Saturn. Lightning strokes emit electromagnetic energy across a broad range of wavelengths, including the visual wavelengths we see and long radio wavelengths that cause static on an AM radio during a thunderstorm. Some of the radio waves propagate upwards and can be detected at long distances by the radio and plasma wave science instrument on Cassini...
Keywords: What -- Cassini; What -- Radio and Plasma Wave Science Instrument; What -- Saturn; What -- Huygens Probe; Where -- Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL); Where -- California; Where -- Washington; Where -- Iowa
Downloads: 11
[movies]Lightning Sounds from Saturn (Audio) - NASA/JPL/University of Iowa
Click on the image for Lightning Sounds from Saturn This audio clip was created from radio signals received by the radio and plasma wave science instrument on the Cassini spacecraft. The bursty radio emissions were generated by lightning flashes on Saturn and are similar to the crackles and pops one hears on an AM radio during a thunderstorm on Earth. This storm on Saturn occurred on January 23 and 24, 2006...
Keywords: What -- Saturn; What -- Radio and Plasma Wave Science Instrument; What -- Cassini; What -- Earth; What -- Huygens Probe; Where -- Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL); Where -- California; Where -- Washington; Where -- Iowa
Downloads: 301
[image]Entering Saturn's Magnetosphere with a Boom - NASA/JPL/University of Iowa
This graph illustrates the series of sonic booms that took place when the Cassini spacecraft crossed Saturn's bow shock. A bow shock is a shock wave located where incoming solar wind meets a planet's magnetosphere, or magnetic bubble. Differences in electrical charges cause the solar wind to curve around the magnetosphere in the same way that air flows around a supersonic airplane. The resulting turbulence is heard as a sonic boom and is represented here as an increase in wave frequency...
Keywords: What -- Cassini; What -- Saturn; What -- Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS); What -- Radio and Plasma Wave Science Instrument; What -- Huygens Probe; Where -- Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL); Where -- California; Where -- Washington; Where -- Iowa
Downloads: 6
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